Why Donate

Why Donate?

The Need is Dire…

In the US, close to 18,000 new cases of childhood and adolescent cancers are diagnosed each year. Thanks to the latest medical developments, 75% of US kids and teens who have cancer are cured – but almost 4,000 Americans under the age of 18 die of cancer every year.

This is one of the leading causes of death among young people in this country, and even survivors of childhood cancers face a great deal of risk for severe complications later in life. People who survive cancer as children or teenagers go on to have much higher rates of new malignancies, heart and other organ failure, and infertility, and their life expectancy is reduced compared to the general population. Sadly, only 4% of the National Cancer Institute’s annual budget is devoted to childhood and adolescent oncological research.

A child in the hospital holding hands with their parent.

The Need is Dire…

In the US, close to 18,000 new cases of childhood and adolescent cancers are diagnosed each year. Thanks to the latest medical developments, 75% of US kids and teens who have cancer are cured – but almost 4,000 Americans under the age of 18 die of cancer every year.

This is one of the leading causes of death among young people in this country, and even survivors of childhood cancers face a great deal of risk for severe complications later in life. People who survive cancer as children or teenagers go on to have much higher rates of new malignancies, heart and other organ failure, and infertility, and their life expectancy is reduced compared to the general population. Sadly, only 4% of the National Cancer Institute’s annual budget is devoted to childhood and adolescent oncological research.

A little child who is sick giving a peace sign while wearing a hospital gown.

But You Can Make a Difference

Thankfully, progress is still underway. Survivorship rates for childhood cancers are increasing over time, and local member organizations of the Children’s Oncology Group are doing concrete work supporting clinical care, new treatment research, and providing resources to families. 

In accordance with our mission, DCG Giving partners with these charities in order to turn our donors’ contributions into tangible results that improve the lives of children, teens, and their families from coast to coast.

Click here to donate – for our local partners and the people they help, the best time is now.

A little child who is sick giving a peace sign while wearing a hospital gown.

But You Can Make a Difference

Thankfully, progress is still underway. Survivorship rates for childhood cancers are increasing over time, and local member organizations of the Children’s Oncology Group are doing concrete work supporting clinical care, new treatment research, and providing resources to families. 

In accordance with our mission, DCG Giving partners with these charities in order to turn our donors’ contributions into tangible results that improve the lives of children, teens, and their families from coast to coast.

Click here to donate – for our local partners and the people they help, the best time is now.